Chapparal herb Larrea Mexicana
Chapparal herb Larrea Mexicana
Chapparal herb Larrea Mexicana
Chapparal herb Larrea Mexicana

Chapparal herb Larrea Mexicana

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Chapparal herb Larrea Mexicana

The word chaparral is a loanword from Spanish chaparro, meaning both 'small' and 'dwarf' evergreen oak, which itself comes from a Basque word, txapar, that has the same meaning.

Larrea tridentata called creosote bush and greasewood as a plant, chaparral as a medicinal herb,[3] and gobernadora in Mexico. It is Spanish for "governess", due to its ability to secure more water by inhibiting the growth of nearby plants. In Sonora, it is more commonly called hediondill

As the creosote bush grows older, its oldest branches eventually die and its crown splits into separate crowns. This normally happens when the plant is 30 to 90 years old. Eventually, the old crown dies and the new one becomes a cional colony from the previous plant, composed of many separate stem crowns all from the same seed.

The "King Clone" creosote ring is one of the oldest living organisms on Earth. It has been alive an estimated 11,700 years, in the central Mojave Desert near present-day Lucienne California. This single clonal colony plant of L. tridentata reaches up to 67 ft (20 m) in diameter, with an average diameter of 45 ft.